1991 LJ78G-PGT Prado

This vehicle has a Japanese domestic accessory roof rack and ladder.

J7 (1984-Present)

The unparalled success of the Land Cruiser J4 had made it a legend in some of the most remote parts of the world, but by the mid-1980’s the venerable J4 had begun feeling its age. No longer was it acceptable for a vehicle design to only serve utilitarian purposes. Toyota saw how the marketplace was evolving and responded with an updated J4, known as the J7. Since being indestructible was a major element of the Land Cruiser brand, Toyota spent three years developing the J7, ensuring that it would still be as rugged and as powerful as its predecessor.

At the same time, the J7 needed to satisfy the demand of diverse groups around the world: Australian miners in the outback, suburban Americans, African safari guides and many more. In the end, Toyota delivered in a major way. The J7 would have one popular option known as the “heavy duty” Land Cruiser. Another would be the “light duty” model, designed to weigh less and offer greater fuel efficiency. Overall, the J7 would be capable of handling the most punishing terrain while offering multiple body styles, wheelbase sizes, and incredibly, twenty different engines. This makes for over one hundred different model options within the J7 model line.